The #2 Question I Get Asked About Strengths

by | Aug 1, 2013 | Building Self Confidence | 0 comments

Man shrugging

“Now what?”

The second-most frequent question I get asked is, “What do I do with my strengths once I know them?”

Great question! There is so much you can do with your strengths — they really can change your life. You can use your strengths to:

  • Understand why you do things the way you do
  • Bring more of your ‘best self’ to whatever you do, which will feel good, be energizing and probably help you accomplish more
  • Build more meaning into your life, by using your strengths in the service of a cause you care about
  • Deal more capably with challenges
  • Offset your weaknesses

Strengths can also be a great tool for leadership, whether you are a parent, a teacher, a team leader or a CEO. They can help you:

  • See the best in other people

    "Awesome! Let's get started."

    “Guess one way I use my creativity?”

  • Understand why some people complement or clash with each other
  • Encourage and appreciate others in a truly meaningful way
  • Assign roles and responsibilities more strategically
  • Decide who should take the lead in various situations
  • Provide advice and direction that is well-suited to each individual

All of these topics — and more — will be covered in future blogs and resources on this site, so sign up for updates. Also, I’d love to hear any ideas you have or questions you’d like answered, so post below or email me using the form in the right column.

 

 

sea1

Do you need kind, compassionate support to bounce back from a negative experience? If so, then get in touch with me now, and let’s make the most of your precious time, energy and love. 

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Kristen Carter

Kristen Carter, Certified coach, author, and breast cancer survivor. More

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